Maus I, A Survivor's Tale

Maus I, A Survivor's Tale

My Father Bleeds History

Graphic Novel - 1986
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Random House, Inc.
The first installment of the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel acclaimed as “the most affecting and successful narrative ever done about the Holocaust” (Wall Street Journal) and “the first masterpiece in comic book history” (The New Yorker).

A brutally moving work of art—widely hailed as the greatest graphic novel ever written—Maus recounts the chilling experiences of the author’s father during the Holocaust, with Jews drawn as wide-eyed mice and Nazis as menacing cats.

Maus is a haunting tale within a tale, weaving the author’s account of his tortured relationship with his aging father into an astonishing retelling of one of history's most unspeakable tragedies. It is an unforgettable story of survival and a disarming look at the legacy of trauma.

Baker & Taylor
The author-illustrator traces his father's imprisonment in a Nazi concentration camp through a series of disarming and unusual cartoons arranged to tell the story as a novel

Publisher: Toronto : Random House, c1986
ISBN: 9780394747231
0394747232
Branch Call Number: 940.531503924024 Spi-S
Characteristics: 159 p. : ill

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busy2016
May 28, 2016

Because this story is told using cartoon mice (as the Jews) and cats (as the Nazis) prior to and during WWII, I am sorry to say that I was not really disturbed in the behaviors of the cats/Nazis. Had I stopped long enough to consider the real story, I would not have been able to read it. I was more interested in the story of the father's relationships with his first girlfriend, 2 wives and his son (the author). It may have been easier to read in this format, but I don't know how other Holocaust survivors would feel. I won't be reading the 2nd book.

r
ryner
Jul 07, 2008

In Maus, Art Spiegelman illustrates his father Vladek's story -- of growing up as a Jew in Poland, persecuted and eventually captured and sent to Auschwitz during WWII. While portraying tragedy, Maus also manages to have a certain amount of beauty and humor, due partly to the various types of characters being rendered as different animals (e.g. Jews are drawn as mice, Germans as cats, Poles as pigs, etc.). Whenever Vladek and his wife attempt to pass as Poles, they are charmingly drawn wearing pig masks. The scenes portraying Art's relationship with his father are touching and feel very authentic. I'm looking forward to reading Maus II.

e
elloyd74
May 09, 2007

A classic. Beautifully done. Don't forget to read part two, "And Here My Troubles Began"

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