Limits

Limits

The Role of the Law in Bioethical Decision Making

eBook - 1996
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Book News
Dworkin (law, U. of Indiana-Bloomington) argues that the increasing resort to law to resolve questions of medical ethics is a wrong direction that overlooks the intrinsic limitations of the courts and legislature and the fundamental differences between science on the one hand and law, ethics, and politics on the other. He emphasizes the danger of requiring or allowing judges and politicians to decide matters of science in which they have little or no expertise. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Ingram Publishing Services

"An excellent resource for entry-level courses on bioethics for health care practitioners, law students, and physicians." —Choice

"Dworkin’s provocative arguments... will challenge readers who have come to accept the law’s intrusion as a necessary response to biomedical advances." —New England Journal of Medicine

"Important and refreshing. Dworkin’s conclusions regarding the limited role of law (and especially legislation) may come as a surprise to many.... When popular and political views are almost evenly divided, looking to legislation for a solution is a mistake." —Walter Wadlington

The ethical and social dilemmas associated with abortion, sterilization, assisted reproduction, genetics, death and dying, and biomedical research have led many to turn to the legal system for solutions. Rogert Dworkin argues that resort to law often overlooks the limitations of legal institutions, and he suggests a more limited use of the legal system will produce more effective resolution of bioethical dilemmas.



Blackwell North Amer
The ethical and social dilemmas associated with abortion, sterilization, assisted reproduction, genetics, death and dying, and biomedical research have led many to turn to the legal system for solutions. Roger B. Dworkin argues that resort to law is often misguided and overlooks the limitations of legal institutions. He carefully explores constitutional adjudication, legislation, common law, and administrative law as tools for responding to rapid change in biology and medicine, explains how these approaches actually deal with the social issues discussed, and offers suggestions for more limited and effective use of the legal system in the area of bioethics.

Indiana University Press

"An excellent resource for entry-level courses on bioethics for health care practitioners, law students, and physicians." —Choice

"Dworkin’s provocative arguments... will challenge readers who have come to accept the law’s intrusion as a necessary response to biomedical advances." —New England Journal of Medicine

"Important and refreshing. Dworkin’s conclusions regarding the limited role of law (and especially legislation) may come as a surprise to many.... When popular and political views are almost evenly divided, looking to legislation for a solution is a mistake." —Walter Wadlington

The ethical and social dilemmas associated with abortion, sterilization, assisted reproduction, genetics, death and dying, and biomedical research have led many to turn to the legal system for solutions. Rogert Dworkin argues that resort to law often overlooks the limitations of legal institutions, and he suggests a more limited use of the legal system will produce more effective resolution of bioethical dilemmas.



Publisher: Bloomington, Ind. : Indiana University Press, c1996
ISBN: 9780585259666
0585259666
0253330750
Characteristics: 1 online resource (viii, 205 p.)

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