Nature and Artifice

Nature and Artifice

The Life and Thought of Thomas Hodgskin (1787-1869)

eBook - 1998
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Boydell
& Brewer LTD

Thomas Hodgskin (1787-1869), radical thinker, is the subject of this study, and he is presented here as a forerunner of New Right ideology rather thanas `early English socialist'.
Thomas Hodgskin was one of the most significant thinkers of nineteenth-century radicalism. An active writer for over fifty years and an associate of Bentham and James Mill amongst others, his life provides a paradigm for understanding the evolution of radicalism from Waterloo to the Second Reform Act. This study rescues him from his marginalisation and mis-casting as an `early English socialist': far from being a socialist, many of his views seemto mark him out as a forerunner of New Right or neo-liberal ideology. Drawing on a range of new sources and reassessing Hodgskin's life and work, DrStack argues that the crux of Hodgskin's thought was the essentially theological distinction he drew between nature and artifice. Throughout, he makesplain the centrality of providentialism to nineteenth-century radicalism.Dr DAVID STACKteaches in the Department of History at Queen Maryand Westfield College at the University of London.

Boyd Brew
Thomas Hodgskin (1787-1869), radical thinker, is the subject of this study, and he is presented here as a forerunner of New Right ideology rather than as `early English socialist'.
Thomas Hodgskin was one of the most significant thinkers of nineteenth-century radicalism. An active writer for over fifty years and an associate of Bentham and James Mill amongst others, his life provides a paradigm for understanding the evolution of radicalism from Waterloo to the Second Reform Act. This study rescues him from his marginalisation and mis-casting as an "early English socialist": far from being a socialist, many of his views seem to mark him out as a forerunner of New Right or neo-liberal ideology. Drawing on a range of new sources and reassessing Hodgskin's life and work, Dr Stack argues that the crux of Hodgskin's thought was the essentially theological distinction he drew between nature and artifice. Throughout, he makes plain the centrality of providentialism to nineteenth-century radicalism. Dr DAVID STACK teaches in the Department of History at Queen Mary and Westfield College at the University of London.

Blackwell North Amer
Thomas Hodgskin was one of the most significant thinkers of nineteenth-century radicalism. An active writer for over fifty years and an associate of Bentham and James Mill among others, his life provides a paradigm for understanding the evolution of radicalism from Waterloo through to the Second Reform Act.
This study of Hodgskin seeks to recover him from his marginalisation and miscasting as an 'early English socialist': far from being a socialist, many of his views seem to mark him out as a forerunner of New Right or neo-liberal ideology. Drawing on a range of new sources and reassessing Hodgskin's life and work, Dr. Stack argues that the crux of Hodgskin's thought was the essentially theological distinction he drew between nature and artifice; building on this argument, he emphasises the continuity and consistency in Hodgskin's thought and career.

Publisher: [London] : Royal Historical Society, 1998
ISBN: 9780585218663
0585218668
0861932293
Characteristics: 1 online resource (x, 247 p.)

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