Wolves of the Calla

Wolves of the Calla

Book - 2003
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Baker & Taylor
A long-anticipated fifth installment of the series continues the adventures of gunslinger Roland, who with his companions endeavors to reach and hopefully save the Dark Tower, a quest that is challenged by the evil wolves of Thunderclap, who are abducting the children of the residents of a town in the tower's shadow. 500,000 first printing.

Blackwell North Amer
Roland Deschain and his ka-tet are bearing southeast through the forests of Mid-World, the almost timeless landscape that seems to stretch from wreckage of civility that defined Roland's youth to the crimson chaos that seems the future's only promise. Readers of Stephen King's epic series know Roland well, or as well as this enigmatic hero can be known. They also know the companions who have been drawn to his quest for the Dark Tower: Eddie Dean and his wife, Susannah; Jake Chambers, the boy who has come twice through the doorway of death into Roland's world; and Oy, the Billy-Bumbler.
In this fifth novel in the saga, their path takes them to the outskirts of Calla Bryn Sturgis, a tranquil valley community of farmers and ranchers on Mid-World's borderlands. Beyond the town, the rocky ground rises toward the hulking darkness of Thunderclap, the source of a terrible affliction that is slowly stealing the community's soul. One of the town's residents is Pere Callahan, a ruined priest who, like Susannah, Eddie, and Jake, passed through one of the portals that lead both into and out of Roland's world.
As Father Callahan tells the ka-tet the astonishing story of what happened following his shamed departure from Maine in 1977, his connection to the Dark Tower becomes clear, as does the danger facing a single red rose in a vacant lot off Second Avenue in midtown Manhattan. For Calla Bryn Sturgis, danger gathers in the east like a storm cloud. The Wolves of Thunderclap and their unspeakable depredation are coming. To resist them is to risk all, but these are odds the gunslingers are used to, and they can give the Calla-folken both courage and cunning. Their guns, however, will not be enough.

Baker
& Taylor

Along with his companions, gunslinger Roland endeavors to reach and save the Dark Tower, a quest that is challenged by the evil wolves of Thunderclap, who are abducting the children of the residents of a town in the tower's shadow.

Simon and Schuster
Roland Deschain and his ka-tet are bearing southeast through the forests of Mid-World, the almost timeless landscape that seems to stretch from the wreckage of civility that defined Roland's youth to the crimson chaos that seems the future's only promise. Readers of Stephen King's epic series know Roland well, or as well as this enigmatic hero can be known. They also know the companions who have been drawn to his quest for the Dark Tower: Eddie Dean and his wife, Susannah; Jake Chambers, the boy who has come twice through the doorway of death into Roland's world; and Oy, the Billy-Bumbler.In this long-awaited fifth novel in the saga, their path takes them to the outskirts of Calla Bryn Sturgis, a tranquil valley community of farmers and ranchers on Mid-World's borderlands. Beyond the town, the rocky ground rises toward the hulking darkness of Thunderclap, the source of a terrible affliction that is slowly stealing the community's soul. One of the town's residents is Pere Callahan, a ruined priest who, like Susannah, Eddie, and Jake, passed through one of the portals that lead both into and out of Roland's world.As Father Callahan tells the ka-tet the astonishing story of what happened following his shamed departure from Maine in 1977, his connection to the Dark Tower becomes clear, as does the danger facing a single red rose in a vacant lot off Second Avenue in midtown Manhattan. For Calla Bryn Sturgis, danger gathers in the east like a storm cloud. The Wolves of Thunderclap and their unspeakable depredation are coming. To resist them is to risk all, but these are odds the gunslingers are used to, and they can give the Calla-folken both courage and cunning. Their guns, however, will not be enough.

Publisher: Hampton Falls, New Hampshire : D.M. Grant, Publisher, in association with Scribner, c2003
ISBN: 9781880418567
1880418568
Branch Call Number: FIC King
Characteristics: xvi, 714 p. : col. ill
Additional Contributors: Wrightson, Bernie

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danielestes
Mar 25, 2015

In 1999 Stephen King was seriously injured by a wayward van while out walking on a rural route near his home. The details of that accident are colorfully recounted in his pseudo-memoir masterpiece, On Writing. A long recovery followed and, in more ways than one, the whole messy affair inspired him to complete his Dark Tower epic. And complete it he did. He wrote the final three novels back-to-back, and although King has continued to write and publish in the ten years since (I'm writing this review in 2015), few may remember that he did threaten to retire due to creative exhaustion once his sprawling epic was concluded. Wolves of the Calla adheres to the series' western roots by giving us the Mid-World version of The Magnificent Seven. And for the most part King pulled it off. This is a worthy entry in the series. The Good: Going todash and those spine-tingling chimes, visiting the rose in the vacant lot, the Ka-Tet being welcomed at the town pavilion, Callahan's tale and the highways in hiding, the bizarre rural dialect of the townsfolk, training the Sisters of Oriza, Jake and the Dogan, confronting Andy, and the final showdown with the Wolves of course. The Not-So-Good: Saving that pushover Calvin Tower and his stupid rare books, the over-and-over-and-overuse of the number nineteen, the cartoonish weapons of the Wolves—their lazer swords (lightsabers from Star Wars) and their sneetch grenades (snitches from Harry Potter), and book 5's number one gripe from the fans: Stephen King inserting himself into the story. This will play out more in the next two books, but in my opinion it's a wash. King being in the story works in some places and not so well in others.

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